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Saturday, March 15, 2014

March 15th WHMonth KITCHEN HERBOLOGY: POMEGRANATE

TO CELEBRATE WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH (WHM), during the month of March ~ in addition to my weekly postings ~ I will be making DAILY postings of time tested herbal and medicinal foods used from a Medicine Woman's bag.  I hope you enjoyed the first week of Women's History Month "Healers Remedies" and have made some of them a part of your home medicine bag. Starting this second week we will be focusing on "Kitchen Herbology' featuring healing foods and spices from the kitchen.

What's your personal experience with healing foods and spices in the kitchen ~ post your comments to share them ~ so we all can expand the tools in our Medicine Bags!







The Health Benefits of Pomegranates




Video: The Health Benefits of Pomegranates

GHC youtube Video

Pomegranate Research

Researchers are discovering the truth surrounding the pomegranate’s powers, proving why this exotic fruit has claimed such a fabled place in cultures throughout the ages. Scientists conducting research on the many health benefits of pomegranates have made some incredible discoveries.
First, organic pomegranates are full of antioxidants. These are compounds and enzymes known for keeping low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or “bad” cholesterol from oxidizing and causing atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries [1]. Organic pomegranate seeds act a lot like aspirin, keeping blood platelets from sticking together and forming dangerous blood clots [2].
Antioxidants also buffer the effects of free radical damage to your cells caused by oxidation. Free radicals are produced by functions within the body and elements outside the body, such as radiation from the sun. You can’t stop free radical occurrence and oxidation but you can consume foods that help neutralize their potential damage.
Research also shows that eating organic pomegranate seeds and drinking pomegranate juice can increase oxygen levels to the heart [3].
Other studies reveal that, over time, organic pomegranates might help combat erectile dysfunction [4]. This super fruit might also reduce the redness of arthritis by slowing the enzymatic activity that breaks down cartilage.

How to Eat an Organic Pomegranate

The pomegranate is an intricate fruit that contains a maze of seeds inside an encapsulation of bark-like, inedible flesh. It may initially look daunting but there is an easy way to get to all those nutritious, sweet and juicy seeds.
  1. Cut off the crown (you’ll see it) and discard in your compost pile.
  2. Score and slice the rind all around, but don’t cut the rind all the way through.
  3. Soak the pomegranate face down in cold water for about ten minutes.
  4. While the pomegranate is still in the bowl of water, break apart the scored rinds, and remove the seeds from the flesh (the seeds will sink to the bottom of your bowl).
  5. Remove the rind and membrane from the bowl with a sieve or spoon.
  6. Drain the seeds with a colander and pat dry with a paper towel.
To get the most out of an organic pomegranate, eat the seeds while they’re at their freshest and juiciest. This is when their therapeutic powers are at their peak!
Some people suck the juice out and spit out the seed. This is a personal choice but most of the beneficial fiber comes from the seed so it is beneficial to eat it and a waste to ignore it. Organic pomegranate seeds are bursting with a delicious, pleasant, slightly acidic flavor that has all the sweetness of cranberries without the tartness.
I suggest sprinkling the seeds on a green salad or a fruit salad. You’ll be surprised at the awesome extra taste sensation this provides. You can add them to any recipe that calls for fruit or seeds, too. Pomegranates are often used in Middle Eastern dishes and make a great cranberry-style sauce.
Organic pomegranate seeds are also perfectly delicious eaten all by themselves.

Health Benefits of Organic Pomegranates

Organic Pomegranate Seeds
Packed with antioxidants equal to those in green tea and red wine, and especially loaded withvitamin C and potassium, pomegranates are believed to help:
  • Lower Risk of Heart Disease [5]
  • Lower Risk of Cancer, Especially Prostate and Breast [6]
  • Lessen Symptoms of Diarrhea [7]
  • Reduce Cholesterol [8]
  • Control Your Weight [9]
  • Fight Cell Damage [10]
Pomegranates are one of the few fruits where the juice is just as beneficial as the fruit or seeds. The peel, which you can’t eat, contains the most antioxidants, and they are released in abundance when the fruit is squeezed for juicing.
Note: Eating pomegranates might interfere with certain medications in the same way that grapefruit juice does. Be sure to ask your doctor or pharmacist about drug interactions.
Pomegranate’s wine-red juice will stain your fingers, clothes, and countertops! Be careful with these.
- Dr. Edward F. Group III, DC, ND, DACBN, DCBCN, DABFM



MORE INFORMATION:

http://www.wellcorps.com/MedicinalPropertiesPomegranates.html

Friday, March 14, 2014

March 14th WHMonth KITCHEN HERBOLOGY: ROSE HIPS

TO CELEBRATE WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH (WHM), during the month of March ~ in addition to my weekly postings ~ I will be making DAILY postings of time tested herbal and medicinal foods used from a Medicine Woman's bag.  I hope you enjoyed the first week of Women's History Month "Healers Remedies" and have made some of them a part of your home medicine bag. Starting this second week we will be focusing on "Kitchen Herbology' featuring healing foods and spices from the kitchen.

Fell free to share what you learn here with your family and friends ~ and to post comments on your personal experiences with the herbs, foods and remedies ~ so we all can expand the tools in our Medicine Bags!

Rose hips are considered to be super foods because they contain more levels of vitamin C than even oranges and grapefruits.  Rose hips, also known by the names rose hep or rose haw is the fruit of the rose plant that encloses the seeds of the plant.  It is the rounded portion that is seen just below the petals.  This fruit varies in color from red to orange and is composed of many small fruitlets.  Rose hips can be eaten raw or can be used to make jelly, jam, marmalade, beverages, bread and wine.  In addition to being used as a food item, they are also used for medical purposes.  It is a rich source of Vitamin C and is used in the treatment of many health conditions like rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

Rose hips are highly nutritious and offer numerous health benefits.  Rose hips that have been just picked are considered to be the best because they have the highest levels of nutrients in them. It is an excellent source of vitamin C, which is very essential for maintaining proper health of your body.  Rose hips contain the antioxidants like beta-carotene that is converted to vitamin A inside your body, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein, lycopene and zeaxanthin.  In addition to vitamin C, rose hips also contain other vitamins including vitamin E, vitamin K, vitamin B6, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid and folate.  Rose hips are a good source of various minerals like calcium, potassium, manganese, magnesium, iron, phosphorus, zinc and copper.  It is also a good source of carbohydrates, proteins and fiber.

Health Benefits of Rose Hips

cut rose hips
cut rose hips
Because of the high levels of vitamin C and other important nutrients in rose hips, it is considered to be effective as a natural remedy for many health conditions. Drinking rose hips tea regularly is found to have several health promoting benefits. A few of the health benefits of rose hips are explained below.

Rose hips for arthritis

Rose hips have been widely used for the treatment and prevention of rheumatoid arthritis. According to a study issued in “Complementary andAlternative Medicine” in the year 2011, the use of rose hips in treating arthritis may be attributed to anti-inflammatory effects of the various antioxidants present in it. Arthritis is a health condition caused by the disintegration of collagen in your cartilage that functions as a cushion in your joints between the bones. It is characterized by inflammation in your joints and severe pain. According to studies, your risks of developing this condition are increased with low levels of vitamin C in your body. Rose hip, being a rich source of vitamin C can provide you with adequate amount of this vitamin and help in reducing the symptoms of arthritis. Rose hips also contain galactolipids, compounds that help in preventing the breakdown of cartilage in your joints.

Rose hips are considered to be super foods because they contain more levels of vitamin C than even oranges and grapefruits.  Rose hips, also known by the names rose hep or rose haw is the fruit of the rose plant that encloses the seeds of the plant.  It is the rounded portion that is seen just below the petals.  This fruit varies in color from red to orange and is composed of many small fruitlets.  Rose hips can be eaten raw or can be used to make jelly, jam, marmalade, beverages, bread and wine.  In addition to being used as a food item, they are also used for medical purposes.  It is a rich source of Vitamin C and is used in the treatment of many health conditions like rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

Rose hips are highly nutritious and offer numerous health benefits.  Rose hips that have been just picked are considered to be the best because they have the highest levels of nutrients in them. It is an excellent source of vitamin C, which is very essential for maintaining proper health of your body.  Rose hips contain the antioxidants like beta-carotene that is converted to vitamin A inside your body, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein, lycopene and zeaxanthin.  In addition to vitamin C, rose hips also contain other vitamins including vitamin E, vitamin K, vitamin B6, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid and folate.  Rose hips are a good source of various minerals like calcium, potassium, manganese, magnesium, iron, phosphorus, zinc and copper.  It is also a good source of carbohydrates, proteins and fiber.

Rose hips aid in digestion

Rose hips have high levels of pectin in them, which is helpful in binding together the wastes in your intestine and in eliminating them from the body. The fruit acids contained in this fruit aids in digestion. Pectin and the fruit acids together help in preventing digestive disorders like constipation. Rose hip tea is found to be beneficial in relieving urinary tract infections and diarrhea.

Rose hips lower cholesterol and blood pressure

Studies conducted by Swedish and Norwegian scientists found that the intake of rose hips supplement helped in lowering the total cholesterol by 4.9% and the bad (LDL) cholesterol by 6%. They also found that there was change in blood pressure readings too with an average reduction of systolic pressure by 3.4%. This decrease in blood pressure was actually similar to the results obtained from different trials that used conventional medicinal drugs.

Rose hips protects your heart

New research reveals that the regular intake of rose hip could lower the risks of heart diseases by reducing the blood pressure and cholesterol levels.  Rose hips also contain high levels of various antioxidants like flavonoids, carotenoids, and polyphenols that help in preventing cardiovascular diseases.

Rose hips may help in fighting diabetes

According to some studies, rose hips may have the potential to fight diabetes. As indicated by a study published in the American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology and Metabolism in 2011, when powdered rose hip was administered for a period of 20 weeks on mice that were fed with a high fat diet, it helped in preventing the development of diabetes. It was also found that rose hips were effective in controlling blood sugar levels and cholesterol levels. Studies on humans are still going on to determine whether rose hips are useful in preventing diabetes.

Rose hips and treatment of cancer

Several studies have shown that there is a link between the intake of foods high in vitamin C and a lowered risk of developing cancer. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that helps in blocking the effect of unstable molecules called free radicals. These molecules are very dangerous as they can cause damage to the cells of your body. Vitamin C has also been found to boost your immune system by increasing the effects of anti-cancer agents and a type of white blood cells referred to as natural killer cells. Some scientists are of the opinion that this vitamin is capable of preventing the development of different types of cancers, including bladder, breast, cervical, esophageal, intestinal, lung, pancreatic, prostate, salivary gland and stomach cancers, in addition to non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and leukemia. Another benefit of Vitamin C is that it can prevent the spreading of tumors, improve the action of certain drugs used for treating cancer, help your body heal faster post cancer surgery, and lower the harmful effects of chemotherapy drugs. . Rose hips are an excellent source of vitamin C. In fact it contains 20 times the amount contained in oranges. The regular intake of rose hips may therefore be beneficial for preventing cancer.

Rose hips boost your immune system

The high levels of vitamin C in rose hips help in strengthening your immune system and in protecting your body from diseases caused by viruses and bacteria. Rose hips also stimulate the activities of the thymus gland, a specialized gland that is an important part of the immune system. It produces T-cells that are responsible for fighting diseases and infections.

Rose hips improve bone health

One of the several benefits of vitamin C is that it plays an important role in the development of collagen, the main protein that constitutes the connective tissues. Reduced levels of collagen in the bones can lead to conditions like osteoporosis. The high levels of vitamin C in rose hips promote collagen formation. Rose hips are also rich in minerals like calcium, magnesium and phosphorus, all of which contribute to increasing the mineral density of your bones and strengthening them, thus helping in preventing osteoporosis.

Rose hips benefits for skin

Rose hips oil has been used for years as an effective skin care remedy. This oil is absorbed easily in to the skin, providing instant hydration and moisturization. It promotes skin regeneration and helps in healing scars and stretch marks. Rose hip oil is a good source of vitamin A, which helps in preventing premature aging and other damages caused by the sun’s rays. Rose hips are rich in antioxidants that help in eliminating the damages caused by the free radicals to your cells. This helps in preventing early aging and reducing the signs of aging such as wrinkles and fine lines.

Rose hips for anemia

Rose hips are a good source of iron, which is an important mineral that is associated with the production of red blood cells. The regular intake of rose hips can therefore help in preventing anemia, improving blood circulation, supplying oxygen to all your vital organs, and increasing metabolic activity. All these features ensure that your body stays healthy and functions at its best.

Side effects of rose hips

In spite of the several health benefits, rose hips also cause certain side effects. Some of the common side effects of this fruit include vomiting, nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, heartburn, constipation, stomach pain, headache, and sleeplessness. It can produce allergic reactions in some people. Respiratory reactions have been reported in people who have been exposed to rose hips dust.
Pregnant and breast-feeding women should consult a doctor before using rose hips. People suffering disorders like anemia, hemochromatosis, or thalassemia, should use rose hips with caution because the high levels of vitamin C in this fruit can cause the increased absorption of iron, which could worsen the condition. If you are a diabetic patient, it is better to seek the advice of a physician before using rose hips as they can sometimes interfere with your blood sugar levels. It also can increase your risk for developing kidney stones.
Supplementing your daily diet with rose hips not only protects you from diseases by improving your immune response, it also contributes to the overall improvement of your health and well being.

Thursday, March 13, 2014

March 13th WHMonth KITCHEN HERBOLOGY: WATERMELON

TO CELEBRATE WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH (WHM), during the month of March ~ in addition to my weekly postings ~ I will be making DAILY postings of time tested herbal and medicinal foods used from a Medicine Woman's bag.  I hope you enjoyed the first week of Women's History Month "Healers Remedies" and have made some of them a part of your home medicine bag. Starting this second week we will be focusing on "Kitchen Herbology' featuring healing foods and spices from the kitchen.

Fell free to share what you learn here with your family and friends ~ and to post comments on your personal experiences with the herbs, foods and remedies ~ so we all can expand the tools in our Medicine Bags!

What's New and Beneficial About Watermelon

  • Alongside of tomatoes, watermelon has moved up to the front of the line in recent research studies on high-lycopene foods. Lycopene is a carotenoid phytonutrient that's especially important for our cardiovascular health, and an increasing number of scientists now believe that lycopene is important for bone health as well. Among whole, fresh fruits that are commonly eaten in the U.S., watermelon now accounts for more U.S. intake of lycopene (by weight of fruit eaten) than any other fruit. Pink grapefruit and guava are two other important fruit sources of lycopene, although in the U.S., these fruits are more often consumed in the form of juice.
  • Health scientists are becoming more and more interested in the citrulline content of watermelon. Citrulline is an amino acid that is commonly converted by our kidneys and other organ systems into arginine (another amino acid). The flesh of a watermelon contains about 250 millligrams of citrulline per cup. When our body absorbs this citrulline, one of the steps it can take is conversion of citrulline into arginine. Particularly if a person's body is not making enough arginine, higher levels of arginine can help improve blood flow and other aspects of our cardiovascular health. There's also some preliminary evidence from animal studies that greater conversion of citrulline into arginine may help prevent excess accumulation of fat in fat cells due to blocked activity of an enzyme called tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, or TNAP.
  • If you've gotten used to thinking about the juicy red flesh at the center of a watermelon as its only nutrient-rich area—and far more nutrient-rich than the more lightly-colored flesh that is farther out near the watermelon rind—it is time to change your thinking. In a recent study, food scientists compared the nutrient content of flesh from different parts of a watermelon: flesh from the center, the stem end, the blossom end (opposite from the stem), and the periphery (the part nearest to the rind). What they've discovered were impressive concentrations of phenolic antioxidants, flavonoids, lycopene, and vitamin C in all of these different areas. The exact distribution of nutrients was also highly dependent on the variety of watermelon. But there was no area in any of the watermelon varieties that came out badly in terms of nutrients, and in many of the watermelon varieties, the flesh's outer periphery contained impressive concentrations of most nutrients.
  • Recent studies have confirmed the nutritional importance of allowing a watermelon to fully ripen. For example, research has shown that the biggest jump in lycopene content occurs at the time when a watermelon's flesh turns from white-pink to pink. Yet when that flesh continues to ripen, resulting in a color change from pink to red, the lycopene content becomes even more concentrated. Prior to ripening, when the flesh of a watermelon is primarily white in color, its beta-carotene content is near zero. Even when allowed to ripen to the white-pink stage, a watermelon still contains very little of its eventual beta-carotene content. But as it moves from white-pink to pink to red, the beta-carotene content of a watermelon steadily increases. Like lycopene and beta-carotene, total phenolic antioxidants in a watermelon also increase consistently during ripening, all the way up until the appearance of fully red flesh. The bottom line: eating a fully ripe watermelon can really pay off in terms of nutrient benefits. Please see our section called "How to Select and Store" to learn about determining a watermelon's ripeness before you purchase it.
When we think of health benefits of watermelon, we tend to ignore the health benefits of watermelon seeds. Benefits of watermelon seeds are quite different from benefits of watermelon sweet, juicy pulp. Further our cartoon characters have promoted spitting of beneficial watermelon seeds (Read bullet speed and Watermelon seed spitting). Considering the nutrient packed in watermelon seeds and health benefits of watermelon seeds, you might need to rethink spitting or discarding watermelon seeds

Nutrition Value of Watermelon seeds

Watermelon seeds are packed with nutrients including fatty acids, essential proteins and lots of minerals. Around 100 gram of watermelon seeds provide around 600 calories same as having 10 loaves of bread. Around 400 calories come from fats in watermelon seeds. Fat content in 100 gram of watermelon seeds is around 80% of daily dietary requirement of fats. Around one third of watermelon seeds is proteins, mainly highly essential proteins like lysine.

Benefits of watermelon seeds for men

Arginine is essential amino acids present in Watermelon seed, which is believed to improve sexual health in men. A2013 study, suggests that Arginine promotes production of nitric oxide in body and is helpful in treating acute arteriogenic Erectile dysfunction. Consumption of watermelon and watermelon seeds is believed to increase sperm production and sustain erection. Often touted as Red Viagra.

Mineral and Vitamin content of watermelon seeds

Watermelon seeds are good source of vitamin B like Thiamin, niacin, folate. Watermelon seeds are rich in minerals like magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, Zinc, Iron, potassium and Copper. 100 grams of watermelon seeds provides around 139%, 87%, 82%, 74%, 44%, 20% and 37% of daily dietary values of these minerals respectively. Watermelon seeds are also good source of dietary fibers which are essential for healthy bowel movements and digestion.

Eating and Uses of watermelon seeds

Globally watermelon is widely consumed, but in most places watermelon seeds are discarded. In Asian and Middle Eastern countries, watermelon seeds are collected, dried and roasted for eating. Watermelon seeds are also used in making soups or other beneficial products like watermelon seed oil, watermelon seed tea and watermelon seed extract are made.
When we were kids, my Mom used to cook the watermelon seeds: she would lay them out on a napkin, salt them, let them dry and then fry them.  THEY WERE DELICIOUS, AND IT WAS FUN TO PARTICIPATE AND WATCH.
Cooking Watermelon Seeds: We all read how nutritious watermelon seeds are. We can just roast them and eat them as snack. These roasted watermelon seeds can also be used to garnish salads. Oil obtained from watermelon seed is used as moisturizer for skin. Watermelon seed oil finds its place in some of skin care products and cosmetics. Sometimes watermelon seed extract is used instead. Watermelon seed extract is considered as home remedy for stomach and urinary tract related disorders. Tea from ground watermelon seed is also consumed in some parts of glob. It is because of health benefits of watermelon seed tea, it is considered to improve health of kidney. Research is ongoing to confirm this health benefit of watermelon seed tea.

How to make roasted watermelon seeds

Collecting watermelon seed from watermelon we eat is first process. Dark coloured watermelon seeds should be preferred. These collected seeds shall be washed well, removing any pulpy matter. These washed seeds should be dried. You can dry them under sun if you want. These dried seeds should be fried with some oil. Keep stirring the seeds till they look completely roasted. Add some salted water to this pan, and keep heating the seeds till the water is evaporated and seeds are completely dried. Avoid overheating the seeds as you do not want the nutrients especially vitamins to be removed and enjoy completely the health benefits of watermelon seeds.
These salted, tasty watermelon seeds can be stored and enjoyed as munching snack. Roasted and salted watermelon seeds remains as one of the traditional Egyptian snacks. These seeds can also be ground into cereal and used to make bread or used in stews and soups. (read more: 1)

Health benefits of Watermelon seeds

Flickr user - diwineanddine -Health benefits of watermelon seeds
Essential Amino Acids – Amongst all the amino acids body requires, there are some known as essential amino acids which body cannot produce. These include arginine, lysine and others. Watermelon seeds supply some of these essential amino acids including tryptophan, glutamic acids. Lysine plays important role in calcium absorption and formation of collgen and connective tissues in body. Arginine helps in improvement of body metabolism, cardio vascular system and sexual health.
Watermelon seeds are rich in magnesium and 100 grams of watermelon seeds provide around 139% of daily dietary requirement of magnesium. Magnesium is responsible for normal heart functioning, promoting normal blood pressure, supporting energy metabolism and protein synthesis. It has beneficial effect in treating cardiovascular diseases, hypertension. Magnesium regulates carbohydrate metabolism and thereby checks blood sugar and controls diabetes.
Watermelon seeds are equivalent to multivitamin B complex supplements we consume. Some of the vitamin B present in watermelon seeds include niacin, folate, thiamine, riboflavin, vitamin B6, panthothenic acid. About 100 gm of watermelon seed provide 19% daily value of niacin, which is essential in maintaining the nervous system, digestive system and skin health.
Water melon seed is considered demulcent. Lipids in watermelon seed helps form protective layer mucus membrane and thus reduces inflammation. Watermelon seed is believed to promote production of urine. It thus because of its diuretic action helps excretion of water from body and aids detoxification. It is employed in treatment of urinary passages and treat bed wetting.  An emulsion created by scrubbing and shaking watermelon seeds with water is traditionally used in treating catarrhal infections, disorders of the bowels, urinary passage and fever.
It is also believed to act as body tonic and aids in reduction of blood pressure. It is good vermifuge; Fatty acid extracted from seed as well as its extracts are reported to paralyze tapeworms and round warms. Tar is extracted from seeds which finds medicinal used in treatment of scabies and skin tanning.
Watermelon Seed Oil is also known as Ootanga Oil and Kalahari Oil. African people have understood benefits of watermelon seeds and been using highly nutritive oil from watermelon seeds. Read more about benefits of watermelon seed oil.
The information goes on and on - to read more, please go here:
  http://www.valuefood.info/food/natural-food/nutrition-health-benefits-fruits/health-benefits-of-watermelon-seeds/


Wednesday, March 12, 2014

March 12th WHMonth KITCHEN HERBOLOGY: 15 Power Spices/Herbs

TO CELEBRATE WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH (WHM), during the month of March ~ in addition to my weekly postings ~ I will be making DAILY postings of time tested herbal and medicinal foods used from a Medicine Woman's bag.  I hope you enjoyed the first week of Women's History Month "Healers Remedies" and have made some of them a part of your home medicine bag. Starting this second week we will be focusing on "Kitchen Herbology' featuring healing foods and spices from the kitchen.

Fell free to share what you learn here with your family and friends ~ and to post comments on your personal experiences with the herbs, foods and remedies ~ so we all can expand the tools in our Medicine Bags!

The humble herb and spice rake in your kitchen today need not be just a decorative feature, although they look quite pleasing to the eye hanging on the wall, in both modern and old fashioned styled homes.

Of all the herbs and spices you can choose from for flavor, 
there are 15 that are more powerful than the rest.

1. BASIL - Basil is an herbal carminative, that is, it can relieve gas and soothe stomach upsets. One possible
explanation for its calming effect is a compound called eugenol, which has been shown to help ease muscle spasms. Research is still preliminary, but laboratory studies also suggest that compounds found in basil may help disrupt the dangerous chain of events that can lead to the development of cancer.
2. CAYENNE – Cayenne pepper is a hot red powder made from tropical chili peppers. It contains alkaloid capsaicin, which relieves pain by blocking the chemicals that send pain messages to the brain. If you eat cayenne at the first sign of any type of headache, with plenty of water as a chaser, this spicy herb may be an effective alternative treatment. Added to food, cayenne perks up appetite, improves digestion and relieves gas, nausea, and indigestion. The herb also thins phlegm and eases its passage from the lungs, thus helping to prevent and treat coughs, colds and bronchitis.
3. CINNAMON – Cinnamon bark contains an oily chemical called cinnamaldehyde that kills a variety of illness causing bacteria, including the dreaded E.coli, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus aureas. Research shows that cinnamon is also able to stop the growth of the Asian flu virus. Herbalists report that cinnamon bark also helps regulate the menstrual cycle and checks flooding during menopause. Also cinnamaldehyde has a tranquilizing effect that helps reduce anxiety and stress.
4. CLOVE – Oil of clove is 60 to 90 percent eugenol. A potent pain deadening antimicrobal. Clove has earned the official endorsement of the FDA as an effective stopgap measure for tooth pain. Clove is also among the spices that can help the body use insulin more effectively, thus lowering blood sugar somewhat. In one lab study, clove was also found to speed healing of the dreaded cold sores. On the ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) scale used by the National Institute on Aging in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to assess the antioxidant value of foods, clove has the highest ORAC score.
5. DILL – Dill has been used to soothe the digestive tract and treat heartburn, colic and gas for thousands of years. In fact, the word dill comes from the Old Norse word dilla, meaning to lull or soothe. The herb has an antifoaming action that suggests why it might help break up gas bubbles. Like parsley, dill is rich in chlorophyll, which also makes it useful in treating bad breath.
6. FENNEL – Rich in volatile oils, fennel is what’s known as a carminative herb, meaning that it canease bloating, gas pains, and digestive spasms in the small and large intestines. Fennel can also reduce bad breath and body odor that originates in the intestines. Women who are breastfeeding may find that fennel, which works in a way similar to the body’s hormones, increases milk flow.




7. GARLIC – Intact garlic cloves contain an odorless, sulphur-containing amino acid called alliin. When the garlic is crushed, alliin becomes allicin. Research shows that allicin helps lower cholesterol and blood pressure and also helps prevents blood clots. Garlic can also reduce the risk of developing atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries). Compounds in this familiar bulb kill many organisms, including bacteria and viruses that cause earaches, flu and colds. Research indicates that garlic is also effective against digestive ailments and diarrhea. What’s more, further studies suggest that this common and familiar herb may help prevent the onset of cancers.
8. GINGER – When it comes to quelling the queasiness of motion sickness, ginger has no equal say herbalists. In fact, researchers have demonstrated that ginger beats dimenhydrate, the main ingredient in motion sickness drugs such as Dramamine, for controlling symptoms of seasickness and motion sickness. Ginger stimulates saliva flow and digestive activity, settles the stomach, relieves vomiting, eases pain from gas and diarrhea, and is effective as an anti-nausea remedy. This aromatic herb also helps lower cholesterol. Herbalists have also found it to be useful as a pain reliever.
9. MINT – Herbalists the world over use mint, as a premier stomach tonic, to counteract nausea and vomiting, promote digestion, calm stomach muscle spasms, relieve flatulence, and ease hiccups. Menthol, the aromatic oil in peppermint, also relaxes the airways and fights bacteria and viruses. Menthol interferes with the sensation from pain receptors, thus it may be useful in reducing headache pain. Scientific evidence suggests that peppermint can kill many kinds of micro-organisms, and may boost mental alertness. In one study, people who inhaled menthol said they felt as if it relieved their nasal congestion, although it didn’t increase their measurable air flow.
10. OREGANO – Oregano contains at least four compounds that soothe coughs and 19 chemicals with antibacterial action that may help reduce body odor. The ingredients in oregano that soothe coughs may also help un-knot muscles in the digestive tract, making oregano a digestive aid. This familiar spice also contains compounds that can lower blood pressure too.
11. PARSLEY – Diuretic herbs such as parsley prevent problems such as kidney stones and bladder infections and keep our body’s plumbing running smoothly by causing it to produce more urine. They also relieve bloating during menstruation. Also there’s a reason for that parsley on the edge of the diner plate, its not just there for fancy decoration; it’s an effective breath freshener because it contains high levels of chlorophyll.
12. ROSEMARY – Rosemary is one of the richer herbal sources of antioxidants, which have been shown to prevent cataracts, and contains 19 chemicals with antibacterial action that help fight infection. Traditionally used to ease asthma, this common culinary ingredient has volatile oils that can reduce the airway constriction induced by histamine, that chemical culprit of asthma and other allergy symptoms. Herbalists think that rosemary may also help ease breast pain by acting as a natural drying agent to fluid filled cysts.
13. SAGE – The oils found in sage are both antiseptic and antibiotic, so it can help fight infections. Sage is effective for symptoms of menopause, night sweats and hot flashes, because of its estrogenic action and because its tannins can dry up perspiration. There’s also compelling evidence that sage may be of value to people with diabetes for whom the hormone insulin does not work as efficiently as it should. Lab studies indicate that sage may boost insulin’s action.
14. THYME – Thyme contains thymol, which increases blood-flow to the skin. The warmth is comforting, and some herbalists believe that the increased blood-flow speeds healing. An anti-spasmodic. Thyme relaxes respiratory muscles and is endorsed for treating bronchitis by Commission E, the expert panel that judges the safety and effectiveness of herbal medicines for the German government. Aromatherapists say that thyme’s scent is a mood lifter.
15. TURMERIC – Many clinical studies agree that curcumin in turmeric has anti-inflammatory effects, including a significant beneficial effect in relieving rheumatoid arthritis and carpal tunnel syndrome. Curcumin, which gives this spice its familiar yellow pigment, may also lower cholesterol. Turmeric is also packed with antioxidants, including vitamins A, C, and E, which have been shown to prevent cataracts. Turmeric should not be used by people with gallstones or bile obstruction. Though turmeric is often used by pregnant women, it is important to consult with a doctor before doing so as turmeric can be a uterine stimulant.
Passed down to us by our forefathers and countless generations throughout the world, these 15 food additives and enhancers are just a selected few that are currently known to have medicinal and beneficial properties, yet represent the more commonly used.
SOURCE: http://www.kipnews.org/2011/08/03/15-powerful-healing-herbs-in-your-kitchen/